Red Ribbon Week

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    A group of Umpire 4th graders celebrating “Drug-Free I Believe In Me/Wear Red Day”.
    A group of Umpire 4th graders celebrating “Drug-Free
    I Believe In Me/Wear Red Day”.
    Umpire High School students celebrating “I Have the Power to be Drug Free/Super Hero Day” .
    Umpire High School students celebrating “I Have the Power
    to be Drug Free/Super Hero Day” .
    Karter, Adi, and Kason Mounts dressed up for camo and mismatch days during Red Ribbon Week at Dierks Schools.
    Karter, Adi, and Kason Mounts dressed up for camo and mismatch
    days during Red Ribbon Week at Dierks Schools.
    Karter, Adi, and Kason Mounts dressed up for camo and mismatch days during Red Ribbon Week at Dierks Schools.
    Karter, Adi, and Kason Mounts dressed up for camo and mismatch
    days during Red Ribbon Week at Dierks Schools.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    Students and staff of Nashville Elementary donned their camo attire on Tuesday.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    Nashville Primary teacher, Sarah Rachel, with ‘Kinder Kiddos”.
    Nashville Primary teacher, Sarah
    Rachel, with ‘Kinder Kiddos”.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    These groups of Nashville Elementary students were all decked out in red on Monday to kick off Red Ribbon Week.
    NJHS 7th graders dressed up for “Way Back Wednesday”.
    NJHS 7th graders dressed up for “Way Back Wednesday”.
    Lizeth Chavelo, MaKenzy Perez, Olivia Coulter, Camry Stewart, Tre lacy, Shemar Johnson, Judy Cassady and Nancy Hartness participate in “Twinkie Day” at Mineral Springs High School.
    Lizeth Chavelo, MaKenzy Perez, Olivia Coulter, Camry Stewart, Tre lacy, Shemar Johnson,
    Judy Cassady and Nancy Hartness participate in “Twinkie Day” at Mineral Springs High School.

    History of Red Ribbon Week
    Parents, schools and organizations
    across the country
    go to great lengths to share the
    message that drugs can be dangerous.
    One event that draws
    great interest is Red Ribbon
    Week, which serves as a vehicle
    for communities and individuals
    to take a stand for children
    through a commitment to drug
    prevention and education. Each
    participant makes a personal
    commitment to live drug-free
    with the ultimate goal of a drugfree
    America. The campaign is a
    week-long effort in which people
    at work, home or school wear a
    red ribbon to raise awareness
    about drug prevention. The red
    ribbon is a message to others
    that drugs are harmful and that
    the person wearing a ribbon is
    living drug-free.
    Red Ribbon Week was initiated
    to honor a fallen Drug
    Enforcement Administration
    Special Agent by the name of
    Enrique “Kiki” Camarena. Camarena
    worked his way through
    college, served in the Marines
    and became a police officer.
    When he decided to join the
    DEA, his mother tried to talk
    him out it. “I can’t not do this,”
    he told her. “I’m only one person,
    but I want to make a difference.”
    The DEA sent Camarena to
    work undercover in Mexico investigating
    a major drug cartel
    believed to include officers in
    the Mexican army, police and
    government. Camarena was
    believed to be ambushed at his
    car and later tortured to death.
    Weeks after his death, friends
    launched Camarena Clubs in Camarena’s
    hometown and around
    California to pay homage to a
    brave man who lost his life fighting
    in the war on drugs. Eventually
    these clubs turned into the
    Red Ribbon Week campaign.
    Young children may not be
    ready to hear Camarena’s full
    story, but they may be receptive
    to other stories about the dangers
    of drugs. School assemblies
    during Red Ribbon Week are can
    bring this message to students.
    Frequently school administrators
    will have a younger speaker
    who is not a faculty member
    address the consequences of
    doing drugs. This person may
    have had experiences with drugs
    and is now recovered and wants
    to share his or her story.
    During Red Ribbon Week,
    parents and school administrators
    can encourage children to
    speak about the perils of drug
    use and wear their own ribbons
    proudly. Organizations, such as
    Boy Scouts of America and the
    Girl Scouts, can focus on lessons
    about drug awareness and the
    effects of drugs on the body.
    Parents can show solidarity by
    also wearing their own red ribbons
    during the week.